Prohibited Equipment Sport
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Prohibited bits and/or bridles are bits and/or bridles that are clearly designed for another purpose, such as bits for cart horses, or are part of tack designed for a different riding style/culture, or are used in another way than what they are designed for. Only reins that go directly from the rider's hands to the correct attachment point on the bit or bit less bridle are allowed.
Prohibited shoes, rings or soles are shoes, rings or soles that are clearly designed for another purpose other than riding horses.
These rules apply to sport and gæðingakeppni events (including YouthCup). For breeding shows other rules apply. In addition to this general rule the Sport Committee maintains the following list of equipment that is not allowed for specific reasons:

Bits  

  • Myler combination bits with short or long shanks (and similar bits from other producers)
    This type of bit combines bitless techniques (hackamore) with a bit and is designed as a training bit.
Click here to enlarge the picture
  • Peruvian bit (and other bits typically designed for specific other horse cultures)
    This kind of bits is not fitting to the Icelandic Horse riding style and/or culture.
Click here to enlarge the picture
  • Sliding gag bits (bits that can move up and down along the cheek pieces of a bridle).
    These bits are mainly correction bits and not suitable for showing horses.
Click here to enlarge the picture
  • Ported, straight mouth Icelandic bit.
    This bit has been determined to be too severe and not conforming to the traditional design of Icelandic bits.
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Bridles and nosebands  

  • The drop (German/Hanoverian) noseband or lever noseband in combination with all bits used with a curb chain.
    This type of bit should be used with another noseband as it does not fit very well together. It leads to an ugly picture. The upper part of the curb could easily get stuck in the drop noseband. The functioning of the chain is affected by the position of the laces in the combination with the leveler noseband.
Click here to enlarge the picture
  • The flash nosebands or Mexican noseband in combination with all bits with upper and/or lower cheeks (leverage mechanism).
    The flash noseband or Mexican noseband fits badly with most of these bits and in some cases the combined mechanism makes the equipment very severe. Prohibited as of April 1, 2011.
Click here to enlarge the picture
  • The drop (German/Hanoverian) noseband or leveler noseband in combination with all bits with upper and/or lower cheeks (leverage mechanism).
    This type of bit should be used with another noseband as it does not fit very well together. It leads to an ugly picture. The chain and the lower part of the noseband could come very close to each other so the skin can easily get squeezed. The functioning of the cheeks is affected by the position of the laces in the combination with the leveler noseband.
Click here to enlarge the picture
  • Kineton noseband
    This type of noseband combines bitless techniques (hackamore) with a bit and is designed for use in training. This is not appropriate for use in competition.
Click here to enlarge the picture
  • A conventional bitted bridle used together with a bitless bridle.
    This is against the intention of the bitless bridle.
  • The flash nosebands or Mexican noseband in combination with all bits used with a curb chain
    The flash noseband or Mexican noseband fits badly with most of these bits and in some cases the combined mechanism makes the equipment very severe. Prohibited as of April 1, 2011.
Click here to enlarge the picture

The pictures shown are provided as an example only. Pictures can be enlarged by clicking on them.
List maintained by the FEIF Sport Committee.
Last update: 06-Nov-2017 18:52:48 UTC